Monday, 8 August 2016

A poem by Sarah Carey

Identity Theft


My husband worries someone is trying to steal “our” identity.
There was in fact a letter from the IRS

about a fraudulent tax return. Nothing came of it—
we paid our thousands to the government—

but the worry-seeds took root. We sleep
less well at night, fight panic on days

the mail is late, as if it might not come,
as if someone had absconded with our packages,

our bills, and oh yes, what few personal cards
there might be from a relative or friend.

Suddenly encryption isn’t good enough.
We decide to put a hold on things. Our credit,

for example. Records vanish into the shredder.
Extra anti-virus downloads occupy our desktop.

Soon we’re locked so tight, a thief
would have a time breaking the firewall.

We race to the deep web, looking over
our shoulders. My husband’s hands are everywhere,

his prints on my keys. Then there’s the cloud,
where our trove of photos has become a heaven

we visit to remember faces, to remind ourselves
how our parents looked, how we looked

when we were young, unconcerned with betrayal,
uncompromised. We stay safe, our drives restored,

no worries to eschew. It’s simple:
If my husband’s life is taken, I’ll vanish, too.





Sarah Carey is a graduate of the Florida State University creative writing program. Her work has appeared in Rattle, The Carolina Quarterly, Portland Review and elsewhere. Her poetry chapbook, The Heart Contracts, is pending publication from Finishing Line Press.

2 comments:

  1. Hmm, very interesting idea of a poem. I have read it for a several times, I really like it. I think you may become a good uk essay writer cuz your writing skills are really amazing! Thanks for posting!

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  2. Thank you very much, Ronald! I'm so glad you enjoyed the poem.
    Sincerely,
    Sarah

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