Monday, 26 December 2016

A poem by Alicia Hoffman

Every Day I Discover Something


A carpenter ant curling the lip of the dog’s dish.
A cutworm moth clinging to the kitchen towel.

Just yesterday, corn tassels grew like unicorn horn
from what we had hastily planted in infertile soil.

There is a man that lives on the corner who speaks
no English beyond Good Morning, How Are You?

Every day I discover him near the garage of his house
trying to tune an ancient radio, unrig a washer, dryer,

fridge. A junk collector, he drives the city on Thursdays,
crams treasures into a rusted-out van. The fact I speak

no Spanish shames me. I smile and nod and wave.
Walk away. I am aging. At night I slather creams

on the creases of my face. I measure appropriate intakes
of sugar, salt. Every day I discover more ants. Unsure

of where they are coming from I take the small hose
of the vacuum and suck them up. If I’m killing them

or giving them a wild ride they can climb out of
I do not know. Too many hold on to God. Only He

gives us what we can handle, the church ladies say. Days
I feel I am saved from some mysterious being coming

to squash me like a bug under a boot I don’t say a prayer.
I see the crabgrass grow and the clover speckle the lawn

like small stars. Most of us are strong enough untested.
By day, I weed out the dandelions. By night, they rise.








Originally from Pennsylvania, Alicia Hoffman now lives, writes, and teaches in Rochester, New York. Her poems have appeared recently in Radar, Redactions: Poetry and Poetics, A-Minor Magazine, Word Riot, Hermeneutic Chaos, The Inflectionist Review, and elsewhere. Her second collection , Railroad Phoenix, is coming out early 2017.

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