Thursday, 2 August 2018

A poem by C. M. Donahue

To the Acquaintance Hell-bent on Social Niceties


It happened just the other day in the cereal aisle. Our
carts sideswiped like a dry kiss from a septuagenarian
aunt you’ve only just met. Our eyes locked. A flicker
of recognition flashed between us. I glanced away and 
mumbled something orbiting a weak apology. Is it you?
How have you been? you asked. I let out a sigh. No, I’m 
afraid not. It isn’t me. Your head cocked to the side
as a deep rustling surrounded us. The fluorescent 
lighting seemed to surge and blind. A cascade of cereal 
boxes began tumbling one by one off the shelves 
around us like a riffle of cards. Buffeted by Cheerios
and Life, I lost consciousness briefly and dreamed
of my life as a chameleon. I was almost unseen.
I was almost always there. When I awoke,
I built a fort with the cauliflower and
canned mandarins salvaged from my crumpled cart.
It might take years for you to find me.










C. M. Donahue holds a BFA in Poetry from Emerson College and an MA in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Connecticut.

2 comments:

  1. Oh yes, I feel you on this one. Nice job, as we all have been there.

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  2. Thanks so much for the comment! Glad to hear you could relate to my poem.

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